Tag Archives: earth

Chimborazo | Oh Father Taita, your majestic mightiness brings me to my knees. | HartHaiku.com

Chimborazo | Earth’s majesty

There is nothing quite like a mountain to remind us of Earth’s power and majesty. Stories and legends abound about mountains, and they are considered sacred in various cultures worldwide. Don’t miss these great photos of 6 of the most sacred mountains on Earth.

The subject of this haiku, Chimborazo, is a dormant volcano and the highest mountain in the Andes mountain chain in Ecuador. At 20,548 ft., its summit is the farthest point on the Earth’s surface when measured from the Earth’s center. The indigenous peoples in Ecuador have dubbed Chimborazo “Taita”, which means father. My ode to Chimborazo is actually comprised of three haiku stanzas:

Oh Father Taita!
Your majestic mightiness
brings me to my knees.

When I am burdened
with the every day mundane,
I gaze heavenward.

And you remind me
of my rightful place here on Earth –
Human free spirit.

Haiku_190929

When I visited Chimborazo last year, a guide drove our small group partway up the mountain to a hiker rest station at 16,000 ft. As I stood on the mountain face and looked upward to the peak, I was quite frankly in awe.

There are many indigenous legends around the volcanic mountains in Ecuador. A quote from the Ecuadorian folklore article on the UEX web site:

“For the indigenous people of Ecuador these volcanoes and mountains hold even greater importance in the stories of folklore and mythology. These legends have been passed down through families and communities through story telling. Stories often have themes of love and heartbreak, the volcanoes have been given genders and names…

Ecuadorian folklore stories are important as they value cultural identity and its traditions. They also comment on the universal characteristics of human kind and as indigenous belief suggests we should acknowledge the greater, natural world around us.”

Hart Quill | Susan L Hart | Author Blog   Follow in Facebook

Chimborazo | Earth’s majesty © Susan L Hart 2019

Photo courtesy Pixabay

Folly | Mother forgive us, for our eyes too long blind to your lifeblood and love. | HartHaiku.com

Folly | Humanity’s fate

A fundamental belief in Native culture is that we are deeply connected to the Earth. Papatūānuku, Gaia, Pachamama – the Earth Mother goes by many names. Some people reading this are immediately thinking, “Well ya, duh, of course!” We depend on her for food, it is becoming glaringly obvious we are susceptible to changes in her climate, etc.

But wait! There is a second and even more important principle that hooks into this belief. And that is, that by virtue of all the Earth provides for us, we owe her respect. We owe it to live in harmony with her. We owe her gratitude.

We are blowing it. When will we all really open our eyes to the fact that we each play a part in this? That is, the using up of our most important partner and asset, the Earth. It starts with our own attitudes, gratitude and respect.

Progress is not a given simply by a forward movement in linear time. It is not something that is fact because we have more technology. It is measured by the quality of life and harmony experienced by humanity. It is evident in the higher principles of life practiced in any society. And viewed in that way, currently humanity is in a state of devolution. It is up to us to decide our priorities, what is really important in life.

And we must all do it soon. The web of life is disintegrating before our very eyes.

Haiku_190926

Inspirational Quotes:

“This we know: The earth does not belong to man, man belongs to the earth. All things are connected like the blood that unites us all. Man did not weave the web of life; he is merely a strand of it. Whatever he does to the web, he does to himself.” ~ Chief Seattle, How can you buy or sell the sky?

“We need acts of restoration, not only for polluted waters and degraded lands, but also for our relationship to the world. We need to restore honor to the way we live, so that when we walk through the world we don’t have to avert our eyes with shame, so that we can hold our heads up high and receive the respectful acknowledgment of the rest of the earth’s beings.” ~ Robin Wall Kimmerer, Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge, and the Teachings of Plants

“Every living thing has its own creation song, its own language, and its own story. In order to live harmoniously with the rest of creation, we must be willing to listen to and respect all of the harmonies that are moving around us.” ~ Sherri Mitchell, Sacred Instructions: Indigenous Wisdom for Living Spirit-Based Change

“A species and a culture that treat the natural world with respect and reciprocity will surely pass on genes to ensuing generations with a higher frequency than the people who destroy it. The stories we choose to shape our behaviors have adaptive consequences.” ~ Robin Wall

“To understand the Dreamtime, you must understand that we do not own the land. The land is our mother and she owns and nurtures us.” ~ Lance Morcan, White Spirit

Hart Quill | Susan L Hart | Author Blog  Follow in Facebook

Folly | Humanity’s fate © Susan L Hart

Free Spirits | When the world burdens, nature's there to remind us; We're meant to live free. | HartHaiku.com

Free Spirits | Your essence

There was a time in Hawaii – I’ll never forget it – when the ocean spoke to me of freedom. A storm was blowing in from Japan, and word was that within a couple of days the surfing would be stellar. My partner and I awoke at midnight to the thunderous sound of pounding waves. Makena Beach was several miles away, so we leapt into the car and raced over to check it out.

Makena is about 2/3 of a mile long, wide and undeveloped. It is not a main surf beach; the big surfing happens elsewhere on Maui. But, the waves were uncommonly large for Makena that night. There were no man-made lights, save for several small dots twinkling way off in the far distance.

Uncommon wild beauty

When we arrived, the scene that lay before us took my breath away. The beach and the water were lit brilliantly by a magnificent full moon. Light clouds flitted in and out in the strong breeze. The rolling huge waves frothed white in the blazing moonlight, crashing wildly on the shore.

We took our shoes off and walked. The beauty and power of the scene were intoxicating, and my soul was unleashed in a way I had never experienced before.

Nature speaks to the essence of me

I felt what it means to be just a human being on the Earth, and the inherent freedom of my soul. For just a little while, the pulse of nature ran through me like a jolt of electricity. I felt the wildness and joy of my essence. I was completely alive, and I did not want that feeling to end.

The wild, untamed places discovered in my travels without fail have this affect; they speak to my soul. And I have come to understand this:

Our essence is freedom, and we must never let that go.

Hart Quill | Susan L Hart | Author Blog   facebook

Free Spirit © Susan L Hart 2019

Pinnacle | My head in the clouds, the wind whispers its wisdom. My soul sings its bliss. | HartHaiku.com

Pinnacle | Soaring spirit

Mighty Chimborazo! If you have never heard of it, Chimborazo is a dormant volcano, the highest mountain in Ecuador, and the highest peak near the equator. At 20,548 ft., its summit is the farthest point on the Earth’s surface from the Earth’s center. The indigenous in Ecuador have dubbed Chimborazo “Taita”, meaning father.

Chimborazo takes my breath away

Last year I was fortunate to visit Chimborazo National Park. A guide drove our little group about three-quarters of the way up the mountain to a rest station, at about 16,000 ft. We got out of the van to walk around, and we all experienced dizziness and shortness of breath with very little exertion. I was quite frankly in awe. That is, of the power and majesty of this mountain, and also the fact that a friend had climbed from base to summit some years ago. What an accomplishment! Our guide told us that this is one of the most dangerous mountains in the world, and other climbers have perished attempting to conquer it.

The feeling of freedom

As I stood at our rest point and gazed upward to the summit, my spirit soared. I have experienced this at other spectacular nature spots in my travels. I was lost in the magnitude and grandeur of the space. In that moment, I was simply a human being connected to the Earth, unencumbered by what I am required to be in our civilization.

It was just the sky, the mountain, and me.

And I was free.

Hart Quill | Susan L Hart | Author Blog   facebook

Pinnacle © Susan L Hart 2019