Tag Archives: art

Monet Message | Monet soul's passion, graceful lilies of water, blossoms of his heart. | HartHaiku.com

Monet Message | Live Passion

Claude Monet’s driving passion in his later years was creating his garden at Giverny. He captured that passion on canvas, creating what was later recognized as a monumental collection of work, his Water Lilies Series.

Have you ever considered what kind of world would we live in if we all followed our soul’s passion? Do most of us even know how to hear our soul’s messages? Too often we manage to muffle them to the faintest whisper, burying our desire for deep fulfillment in some back drawer of our minds. Maybe later… And then later never comes.

Tuning into our soul’s passion

A quote from Women Who Run with the Wolves: Myths and Stories of the Wild Woman Archetype, by Clarissa Pinkola Estes:

“…One of the most important discriminations we can make in this [life] is the difference between things that beckon to us and things that call from our souls…
…When we are connected to the instinctual self,…which is natural and wild, then instead of looking over whatever happens to be on display, we say to ourselves, ‘What am I hungry for?’ Without looking at anything outwardly, we venture inward, and ask, “What do I long for? What do I wish for now?’ Alternate phrases are ‘What do I crave? What do I desire? For what do I yearn?’ And the answer usually arrives rapidly: ‘Oh, I think I want… you know what would be really good, is some this or that… ah yes, that’s what I really want.’
Is that on the smorgasbord? Maybe yes and maybe not. In most cases, probably not. We will have to quest for it a little bit – sometimes for a considerable time. But in the end we shall find it, and be glad we took soundings about our deepest longings…”

Creative people tend to be naturally tapped into their soul’s passion and are driven by a need to speak it to the world. It may be about any number of subjects; for Monet it was his water lilies and the beauty of nature.

But, living passionately is not reserved for the creative ones only. Deep within each of us lies a deep yearning, a need to experience certain things, to feed our souls, and to express our passion to others.

The shift towards living our passion

What dormant passion lies within you, perhaps still untapped and unspoken? Humanity is experiencing a major shift right now, and it is taking place within each of us. Society as it stands says more often than not that we cannot live our passion and practically speaking make a living at it. But what if that’s not true? What if that is an old message, one we can make antiquated, right now?

What is your passion, that thing that makes your soul sing? Use the questions Clarissa Pinkola Estes suggests above, and jot the answer(s) on a paper.

Then start dreaming. Dream big. Claude Monet’s passion for water lilies could not be contained on small canvases, and later his art captured the imagination of the world. Anything is possible within the realm of imagination. Anything.

As the great author Maya Angelou said, “There is no greater agony than bearing an untold story inside you.”

Dare to tell your deepest story to the world, starting now.

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Susan L Hart Author

Monet Message | Live Passion © Susan L Hart 2020

Renaissance | In problems let's see infinite creative seeds for innovation. | HartHaiku.com

Renaissance | Minds

On a scale of 1 to 10, problems we face run in our minds from mildly inconvenient to massively frightening and insurmountable. However, with some time and creative thought, problems can be and are overcome. Even as you read this, there are brilliant minds in the world working on solving our current global challenges.

Consider this: Given the scope of the hurdles that face us, should we not all be contributing to solutions? What if we all started to think of ourselves as Renaissance minds?

I can hear the retort now, “But wait a minute, we’re not all Leonardo da Vincis!” That may true, but, we ARE all endowed with Leonardo’s most basic tools: Curiosity, thought, and intuition. Leonardo tirelessly imagined and worked on his ideas.

Leonardo constantly looked at the world around him and wondered “What if? What if man could fly in the sky like a bird? How far could he go, and how quickly? What if man could swim under water for extended lengths of time? What would he discover?” These ideas and his ensuing drawings richly seeded the collective mind during his lifetime, 1452 to 1519.

So, let’s take Leonardo da Vinci as example and inspiration. Let us look for the genius within ourselves. The definition of a Renaissance person is “one with many talents or areas of knowledge”. I daresay each of us has much more within us than we have dared let ourselves explore.

Let us each take an objective inventory of our own unique talents and knowledge. Let us think of how we can utilize and even stretch those, expanding them beyond the norm into something extraordinary. Let us also think of how we can share them, so others can help to build on them.

When we apply our minds in this way, we will not spend a nano second watching (in fear) and waiting. We will feel empowered. When we believe that we can be part of the creativity and innovation that could positively remodel our world, we will be.

Then just as Leonardo da Vinci envisioned, we will truly soar, together.

Imagine that!

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More on Leonardo’s inventions here: Leonardo da Vinci Inventions

Susan L Hart Author

Renaissance | Minds © Susan L Hart 2020

Your Spark | Aspire to inspire, express that glint inside you, and fire up the world. | HartHaiku.com

Your Spark | Light a fire

Your spark lives at the core of you. It’s your passion for life, love, and all that good stuff. But sometimes the tedium of life can dim our sparks. We get mired in the humdrum existence of “the grind”, working to make a living, paying the bills, all those responsibilities of “earth life” that can weigh down our souls. And our flame burns low.

Look inside yourself. There is at least one thing you’re really good at. You didn’t really have to learn it; you were just immediately good at it when you tried it. And, it makes your heart happy when you do that thing, whether it be cooking, singing, playing an instrument, building something from wood, painting, and on and on it goes. There are a million things you might be good at and that make your heart sing when you do them.

And here’s the thing. You know that joy that you feel when you do them? It vibrates outward and brings great joy to others. It also tends to fire people up and inspire them, so they do the same. And that’s our purpose. That’s the thing we each came here to do, to express those special things we each carry inside of us, and to create, color, enrich, uplift, energize, harmonize, beautify.

So sing your song, paint your picture, play your guitar, cook your food, build your furniture. And if your purpose also becomes your work (that thing you do to make money), so much the better for you. You are then truly blessed. But until then, just create and play. Make your heart and the world happy. Those things you love to contribute, and the people in your life, are what give life meaning.

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Photo courtesy Brett Sayles, Pexels

Susan L Hart Author

Your Spark | Light a fire © Susan L Hart 2019

Water Nymph | Lily you enchant, Monet muse immortalized, etrancing the world. | HartHaiku.com

Water Nymph | Monet’s Muse

Many great masters in art history had their muses, their sources of inspiration. For a male artist this often meant a particular woman; Picasso collected a veritable harem. For Monet, his greatest muse was not a woman at all, but rather a beautiful flower. “Her” name was Lily.

Water Lily, to be specific. The scientific name for water lily is “Nymphaea”, derived from from the Greek word numphé, meaning nymph, which takes its name from the Classical myth that attributes the birth of the flower to a nymph who was dying of love for Hercules. Monet’s sprite muse resided in the extensive Japanese-inspired water gardens he created on his property in Giverny, France.

During the last 30 years of his 86-year-life, Lily became Monet’s burning obsession. He painted almost 300 works of his beautiful muse, over 30 being very large format, immortalizing “her” beauty for all time for the world to love. And we do.

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Inspirational Quote:

The crowning glory of the water lily collection may be the 8 monumental canvases that reside at the The Musée de l’Orangerie. Quote from the The Musée de l’Orangerie website:

The Musée de l’Orangerie  houses 8 of the great Nymphéas [Water Lilies] compositions by Monet created from various panels assembled side by side. These compositions are all the same height (1,97m) but differ in length so that they could be hung across the curved walls of two egg-shaped rooms. The artist left nothing to chance with this set of paintings that he had long pondered over and that were displayed according to his wishes in conjunction with the architect Camille Lefèvre and with the help of Clemenceau. He planned out the forms, volumes, positioning, rhythm and the spaces between the various panels, the unguided experience of the visitor through several entrances to the room, the daylight coming in from above that floods the space when the sun is out or which is more discreet when the sun is masked by clouds, thus making the paintings resonate according to the weather..

…Thus, the representation of a continuum in time and space is materialized. In an equally suggestive way, the elliptical shape of the rooms draws out the mathematical symbol for infinity… More here.

You’ll find a mini virtual look at the l’Orangerie gallery collection here.

Susan L Hart Author

Water Nymph | Monet’s Muse © Susan L Hart